Newsletters

Week in Review
Week of October 3, 2016

Statements

This week the Holy See Mission Delivered 5 Statements at the UN.


General Debate
Second Commitee

On October 4, the Permanent Observer Mission of the Holy See to the UN, gave an intervention during the Second Committee General Debate of the Seventy-First Session of the United Nations General Assembly.   

In its statement, the Holy See praised the accomplishments of the international community over the past 18 months in working together to address global challenges, but noted that at the same time breakdowns of trust, inequalities among and within countries, and violent conflicts have all increased, provoking the worst humanitarian crisis in 70 years. A human-centered approach, grounded in the right life and the capacities of the human person, is necessary to address present challenges. Human persons are part of the solution, not obstacles to development. Integral human development involves ensuring lodging, labor, land, religious freedom, the right to education and other civil rights. It also involves equitable mechanisms for global trade and multilateral financial assistance. It includes fraternity and solidarity. The Holy See said that it hoped that the upcoming Habitat III Conference in Quito later in October would provide the occasion to incorporate this vision of integral development in housing and urban planning.

The statement can be found here.

Agenda Item 26 (a,b): Social Development
(Youth, Ageing, etc.)
Third Committee

On October 4, the Permanent Observer Mission of the Holy See to the UN, gave an intervention before the Third Committee General of the Seventy-First Session of the United Nations General Assembly on Agenda Item 26 (a,b), dedicated to “Social Development (Youth, Ageing, etc.).”   

In its statement, the Holy See noted that as people across the world are as a whole becoming healthier, more educated and better connected, social and economic inequalities are increasing, especially in areas of conflict, political and ethnic strife. It reiterated Pope Francis’ appeal for political leaders to ensure that individuals and communities can enjoy the fundamental right to live in peace and security. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, if achieved with full respect for the dignity of every human life, will reverse the trend of rising inequalities and lay the foundation for peaceful societies. With regard to the crisis of refugees and forced migrants, the Holy See recalled as a best practice Pope Francis’ application of the Golden Rule, that if we want security, we need to give security. The New York Declaration on Refugees and Migrants is a hopeful sign, but will require greater political will, cooperation and solidarity to implement. The challenges required in welcoming refugees and migrants, it said, provide the opportunity for genuine human, social and spiritual growth.

The statement can be found here.

 

Third Committee Agenda Item 106: Crime prevention and criminal justice, and Item 107: International drug control
Third Committee


On October 6, Archbishop Bernardito Auza, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the UN, gave an intervention before the Third Committee of the Seventy-First Session of the United Nations General Assembly on Agenda Items 106 and 107 dedicated respectively to “Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice” and “International Drug Control.”

In his statement, Archbishop Auza reiterated Pope Francis’ words to the General Assembly last year that the narcotics trade is a “new kind of war against society that is “poorly fought” because of widespread corruption, a war that is accompanied by human trafficking, money laundering, arms trade and child exploitation. Drug trafficking exists, Archbishop Auza said, because of demand, and to fight consumption must involve fighting the demand. Legalizing illicit drug use, therefore, is counterproductive because “the fight against drugs cannot be won with drugs.” Those addicted to drugs must be treated with compassion and understanding. Families must likewise be assisted because they are the cornerstone of prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, reintegration and health strategies. Saying no to drugs is insufficient, he stressed: without saying yes to positive realities like love, life and family, efforts will be insufficient.

The statement can be found here.

 

Agenda Item 108, Measures to Eliminate International Terrorism
Sixth Committee
 

On October 5, the Permanent Observer Mission of the Holy See to the UN, gave an intervention before the Sixth Committee General of the Seventy-First Session of the United Nations General Assembly on Agenda Item 108, dedicated to “Measures to Eliminate International Terrorism.”

In its statement, the Holy See reiterated its unequivocal condemnation of terrorism, which it said can only be countered by more cohesive measures at the international level, including denying terrorists access to cyber technologies, arms and ammunitions, and support. It urged vigorous accountability for all violations of international humanitarian law and crimes against humanity, while urging scrupulous respect for human rights and international law in the fight against terrorism. Humanitarian aid must be given to vulnerable groups or persons. The social and political conflicts fueling violence need to be confronted, especially through education and the rejection of narratives and ideologies that engender radicalization, hatred and extremism. Religious leaders have a special role in refuting and denouncing the manipulation of religious injunctions or texts to foment terrorism. Any lasting, effective response to terrorism will happen not just through military means but through a culture of encounter that promotes mutual acceptance and peace.

The statement can be found here.

 

Agenda Item 84: The Rule of Law at the National and International Levels
Sixth Committee
 

On October 7, Archbishop Bernardito Auza, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the UN, gave an intervention before the Sixth Committee of the Seventy-First Session of the United Nations General Assembly on Agenda Item 84, dedicated to “The Rule of Law at the National and International Levels.”

In his statement, Archbishop Auza praised the fact that the Secretary General’s recent report on rule of law activities is ultimate aimed at facilitating access to justice for all, including the poorest and most vulnerable, detainees, indigent persons, refugees and other displaced persons. The rule of law is meant to be an exemplary teacher and expression of society’s capacity to lift the poor, excluded, infirm and imprisoned. The Holy See called special attention to those illegally detained, unjustly accused, mentally or physically handicapped, and those without adequate assistance to defend their rights. It asked the Committee to propose and evaluate rule of law indicators to examine whether the least among us can exercise substantive and procedural due process under the law. It also requested that surveys involve indicators to determine whether accomplishments are effective, inclusive and sustainable. Archbishop Auza stressed the connection between the rule of law and freedom of opinion and expression, particularly for journalists, researchers and activists, as well as the appropriate independence of the judiciary.

The statement can be found here.

----

The Holy See and the Fight Against Human Trafficking

Archbishop Bernardito Auza authored the feature story in the latest publication of the Academic Council on the United Nations System (ACUNS) entitled The Holy See and the Fight Against Human Trafficking. To read the full article, please click here.

 

Upcoming Events