Newsletters

Week in Review
December 14, 2018


Statements

 
General Debate
of the Intergovernmental
Conference to Adopt the
Global Compact for Migration

Marrakech, Morocco

On December 10, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, Secretary of State of His Holiness Pope Francis and Head of the Delegation of the Holy See to the Intergovernmental Conference to Adopt the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) gave an intervention during the General Debate of the Conference taking place in Marrakech, Morocco.   

In his intervention, Cardinal Parolin said that the adoption of the GCM comes at a critical moment in history as more and more people and families are being constrained by factors to leave their homes and undertake involuntary, unsafe and irregular journeys. The GCM, a comprehensive framework of best practices and suggested policy instruments to increase international cooperation and responsibility sharing, seeks to improve the governance of the migration phenomenon to prevent crises and tragedies. He gave particular attention to the question of migrant children and youth, to the right to remain, to integration as a two-way process, and to addressing the push and pull factors that drive people to migrate.

He summarized Pope Francis’ vision for international migration in the four action verbs to welcome, protect, promote and integrate, which he says pervade the GCM, and are already being implemented by Catholic institutions. He concluded by saying that the GCM, although not being signed by some States, is a significant advancement in the international community’s shared response to act in solidarity with people in precarious situations on the move.

The statement can be found here.

 

First Dialogue: Promoting Action on the Commitments of the GCM

Marrakech, Morocco
 
On December 10, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, Secretary of State of His Holiness Pope Francis and Head of the Delegation of the Holy See to the Intergovernmental Conference to Adopt the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) in Marrakech, Morocco, gave a statement during the First Dialogue of the Conference that was dedicated to the theme of “Promoting Action on the Commitments of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration.”   

In his statement, Cardinal Parolin focused on the commitments to peace and disarmament and to integration, which he said are bookends to keep the other GCM commitments upright and orderly. With regard to peace and development, he said we must address the root causes of the migratory flows, especially violent conflicts, extreme poverty, natural disasters and environmental degradation. What’s needed, he said, is a commitment to the integral development of every person, noting that few would leave if they had access to jobs, health care, education, religious freedom, political participation and other basic goods. Concerning integration, he said that migrants must be treated with dignity, which involves due process, protection from traffickers, familial unity, and respect for their religious beliefs and traditions.

The statement can be found here.

 

Second Dialogue: Partnerships and Innovative Initiatives for the Way Forward

Marrakech, Morocco
 
On December 11, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, Secretary of State of His Holiness Pope Francis and Head of the Delegation of the Holy See to the Intergovernmental Conference to Adopt the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) in Marrakech, Morocco, gave an intervention during the Second Dialogue of the Conference that was dedicated to the theme of “Partnerships and innovative initiatives for the way forward.”

In his statement, Cardinal Parolin focused, first, on the composition of partnerships, saying that they should include national and local institutions, the private sector, trade unions, civil society, academia, migrants, diaspora groups and faith-based organizations, the latter of which have proven themselves especially effective as “first” and long-term responders. Second, he addressed the need for a strategic approach that involves the whole of government and whole of society, with both prioritizing each person’s inalienable dignity and integral development. Third, he spoke on the need for innovative action in welcoming, protecting, promoting and integrating migrants through, for example, the use of new technologies and the engagement of the media at every level.

The statement can be found here.

 

High-Level Event to Commemorate the
70th Anniversary of the
Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Marrakech, Morocco
 
On December 10, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, Secretary of State of His Holiness Pope Francis and Head of the Delegation of the Holy See to the Intergovernmental Conference to Adopt the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) in Marrakech, Morocco, gave an intervention during a High-Level Event to commemorate the 70th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)

In his remarks, Cardinal Parolin cited the Preamble of the UDHR that states that the foundation of peace, justice and freedom is recognition of the inherent dignity and inalienable, equal rights of every person and applied that understanding to the dignity and rights of migrants. In countries of origin, transit and destination, he said, every person has the right to be treated with dignity and respect and to have access to basic social services. He also spoke about the right to remain, the principle of non-refoulement and called for dignified integration so that each migrant may be able to contribute to the good health of society.

The statement can be found here.

 

Leaders for Peace: Rondine Youth
Appeal for Human Rights

UNHQ, New York
 
On December 10, Archbishop Bernardito Auza, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations, gave an intervention a side event entitled, “Leaders for Peace: Rondine Youth Appeal for Human Rights,” held at UN Headquarters in New York. Because Archbishop Auza was in Katowice, Poland, representing the Holy See at the 24th Session of the Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, his remarks were read by Msgr. Tomasz Grysa of the Holy See.

In his remarks, Archbishop Auza recalled, on the seventieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), that that Declaration, and the United Nations itself, were responses to two world wars, genocides and other barbarities. The UDHR proclaimed that the foundation of peace in the world is “recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family,” a recognition, he said, that the Rondine Cittadella della Pace (RCP) has been helping young people from conflict situations achieve for 20 years. At the heart of Rondine’s methodology, he said, was to convert dehumanized “enemies” into dignified brothers. He said that Pope Francis has given his support, sympathy and blessing to the Leaders for Peace appeal sponsored by the RCP and encouraged its diffusion.

The statement can be found here.

 

Human Rights and Conflict Transformation: the Role of Faith-Inspired Organizations

The Church Center, New York
 
On December 11, Archbishop Bernardito Auza, Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations, gave an intervention during a side event entitled, “Human Rights and Conflict Transformation: the Role of Faith-Inspired Organizations” held at the Church Center, across from UN Headquarters, in New York. Because Archbishop Auza was in Katowice, Poland, representing the Holy See at the 24th Session of the Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, his remarks were read by Father David Charters of the Holy See.

In his remarks, Archbishop Auza addressed the many ways religious people and faith-based organizations make and build peace. He specified twelve: by inculcating a respect for the dignity of every person as loved by God; by fostering a culture of encounter, solidarity and fraternity; by opening and running schools that form the head and the heart in critical thinking; by preaching and practicing forgiveness and reconciliation; by having recourse to the arms of prayer rather than weapons of violence; by living minimally by the Silver and Golden Rule; by categorically condemning evil; by explicitly forming peacemakers; by focusing on and attempting to eradicate their own sins; by promoting integral human development; by living by ethical criteria for intervention; and by engaging in interreligious dialogue and modeling for all of society the path of peaceful co-existence and resolution of conflicts. He praised the Rondine Cittadella della Pace for its method of transforming conflicts and underlined it spiritual roots in the conversion, life and witness of Saints Francis of Assisi and Romuald, which he said show the type of conversion toward peace that our day so much needs.

The statement can be found here.