Statements

Friday 24 July 2015
Post-2015 Development Agenda
Intervention of the Holy See Intergovernmental Negotiations on the Post-2015 Development Agenda Final Draft, Post-2015 Development Agenda Follow-up and Review New York, 24 July 2015
Intervention of the Holy See Intergovernmental Negotiations on the Post-2015 Development Agenda Final Draft, Post-2015 Development Agenda Follow-up and Review New York, 24 July 2015Distinguished co-facilitators,  At the outset, my delegation would like to thank you once again for your continued leadership during this process.  My delegation welcomes the chapter’s emphasis on a robust, effective, inclusive and transparent follow-up and review framework, as well as its commitment to foster exchanges based on mutual trust with the goal of mutual learning. We also support that the follow-up and review process will be voluntary and country-owned, respecting national policies and priorities.  We also welcome the HLPF as the apex of a global network of review processes, working coherently with the General Assembly, ECOSOC and other relevant actors, in accordance with existing mandates.  On the indicators, while my delegation welcomes the distinction made between the global indicators and indicators created at the national and regional level, but we would seek greater clarification on how they will complement one another and how they will be integrated into a single framework by the Inter-Agency Expert Group on SDGs (IAEG-SDGs) and UN Statistical Commission.  My delegation understands that, in terms of complementarity and integration, the global indicators will track the progress of the agenda based on national indicators, resources, legislation and data. In addition, as mentioned earlier today, reference to the adoption of a set of global indicators should involve the role of both ECOSOC and General Assembly. We would also like to hear more about the role that States will have in the oversight of the development of the indicators and of their integration into the agenda since their technical development could affect national policy. We anticipate that these clarifications will be addressed during the UN Statistical Commission’s presentation next week. Lastly, we welcome the Chapter’s emphasis on high-quality disaggregated data, and in 57 (f) we support the listing of data as it is in the current text. We also support all efforts that will help to strengthen national statistical offices and data systems in developing countries. Co-facilitators, we would like to make a general comment on the current state of negotiations.  It is my delegation’s strong conviction that we have a unique opportunity to adopt an unprecedented agenda that may not only eradicate extreme poverty and achieve sustainable development but that will do so without leaving anyone behind. For this reason, we must avoid controversial language that does not enjoy international consensus and that directly contradicts the national legislation, policies, priorities, and the cultural and religious values of Member States. While this agenda is meant to be universal, some of the recent suggestions, particularly during the discussion of the declaration, would unfortunately make it divisive, in the process discouraging or keeping away many stakeholders from active participation towards the achievement of the SDGs. In this last hour of negotiations, let us strive instead for the consensus that we are already so close to achieving.  Thank you.